National Library of Australia

<< Previous record  /  Next record >>
Record 18 of 41
You must be logged in to Tag Records
Who's Expressing in "Expressive Writing"? [microform] / Janine Reed
Bib ID 5488925
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Reed, Janine
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1988 
13 p. 
Summary

In an attempt to understand what expressive writing means to themselves and to their students, teachers should explore and reflect on various questions regarding expressive writing theories and practices. For many, self-expression is the basis of all serious writing and an important stage in any act of learning, so it is essential to uncover the assumptions that different schools of expressive writing pedagogy make about the self. The psychological theories of Abraham Maslow, Sigmund Freud, and William James have contributed to American notions of self in the 20th century, and their theories present three distinct views of self, which resonate in the composition texts of Ken Macrorie and James Miller. Maslow's concept of self is a unified entity central to the person's being, and its writing pedagogy emphasizes listening to the inner voice this self projects. Freud's view of self is structured into parts which interact with each other, and these interactions--particularly between the conscious and unconscious--form the self. Strategies employed by this pedagogy encourage the writer to free the repressed part of the self in order to find what is natural and true. The "multiple" view of self, as described by James, is like a fluctuating and changing stream, and multiple view pedagogies incorporate this perception of self into their teaching strategies, focusing on stream-of-consciousness writing. Teachers should question whether they are teaching self-discovery under the guise of "expressive writing." (MM)

Notes

ERIC Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Conference in College Composition and Communication (39th, St. Louis, MO, March 17-19, 1988).

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Cognitive Processes.  |  Creative Writing.  |  Higher Education.  |  Psychology.  |  Self Expression.  |  Theory Practice Relationship.  |  Writing Instruction.  |  Writing Processes.  |  Expressive Writing Self Psychology  |  Freud (Sigmund) James (William) Maslow (Abraham) Self Schemas
Form/genre Speeches/Meeting Papers.  |  Opinion Papers.
Available From ERIC 

Online

In the Library

Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

Details Collect From
mc 2253 ED292127 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

Order a copy

- Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.