National Library of Australia

Enjoy a CovidSafe visit to the National Library. Read more...

<< Previous record  /  Next record >>
Record 92 of 354
You must be logged in to Tag Records
A Neglected Challenge [microform] : Minority Participation in Higher Education. Occasional Paper No. Seventeen / Frank H. T. Rhodes
Bib ID 5490158
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Rhodes, Frank H. T
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1987 
19 p. 
Summary

Issues concerning participation by minority groups in higher education in the United States are considered, along with some criticisms of higher education concerning: the substance and style of undergraduate education; efficiency and cost of college; a confusion of aims, missions, and goals among colleges and universities; and access, choice, and admissions issues. Enrollment trends for minorities since World War II are briefly traced, and implications of declining minority participation are noted. Possible responses to declining minority enrollments are recommended: increasing efforts in recruiting, improving retention, providing adequate support services, facilitating employment and graduate and professional study, and fostering wider partnerships with schools. Suggestions for universities and schools include better teacher training programs in the colleges and schools and better opportunities for teacher recognition, career development, and professional satisfaction in the schools. Targets by which to reduce the high school dropout rate nationwide and programs to achieve it are also proposed, along with establishing a meaningful competency level of literacy for school graduates. (SW)

Notes

Availability: Academy for Educational Development, 1255 23rd St., N.W., Washington, DC 20037.

ERIC Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Board of Directors of the Academy for Educational Development (May 1987).

Educational level discussed: Higher Education.

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Academic Persistence.  |  Academic Standards.  |  Access to Education.  |  College Attendance.  |  College Faculty.  |  College Role.  |  College School Cooperation.  |  Declining Enrollment.  |  Dropout Prevention.  |  Enrollment Trends.  |  Higher Education.  |  Minority Groups.  |  Student Recruitment.
Form/genre Opinion Papers.  |  Speeches/Meeting Papers.
Other authors/contributors Academy for Educational Development, Washington, DC
Available From ERIC 

Online

In the Library

Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

Details Collect From
mc 2253 ED293389 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

Order a copy

- Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.