National Library of Australia

We’re delighted to be able to re-open the Library for pre-booked ticketed access to our collections. Read more...

<< Previous record  /  Next record >>
Record 17 of 61
You must be logged in to Tag Records
Nontrivial Pursuit [microform] : The Hidden Complexity of Elementary Logo Programming. Technical Report / D. N. Perkins and Others
Bib ID 5493404
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Perkins, D. N
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1986 
29 p. 
Summary

The thinking processes of students of Logo were examined to identify programming problems and possible instructional remedies. Subjects were 11 students between the ages of 8 and 12 who had completed 5 weeks of Logo instruction. These students were given a series of five short programming problems highlighting such areas of difficulty as judging angles, deciding on the directions of turns, using a variable, and using a subprocedure. The data collected included notes taken by the experimenter recording program errors, attempted repairs, and code written by students. A coding system was used to provide a measure of students' successes and errors in terms of the number of elements in a program they programmed correctly and their problem-solving efforts. The success rate in terms of elements correct was high, but success in terms of programs running successfully was lower, and a number of problems with what might be considered trivial aspects of Logo were recorded. A few students evinced serious problems with understanding tasks involving variables and a subprocedure. Possible explanations for the challenge of trivial elements of programming include: (1) the conjunctivity effect of minor problems; (2) a shortfall in elementary problem-solving strategies; (3) difficulty in discriminating concepts with superficial similarity; and (4) domain and domain operation problems. It is concluded that many trivial elements of Logo pose genuine conceptual difficulties, a problem that instruction must face and resolve. (25 references) (MES)

Notes

Sponsoring Agency: Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC.

Contract Number: 400-83-0041.

Researchers.

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Cognitive Processes.  |  Difficulty Level.  |  Elementary Education.  |  Problem Solving.  |  Programing.  |  Psychological Studies.  |  LOGO Programing Language
Form/genre Reports, Research.
Other authors/contributors Educational Technology Center, Cambridge, MA
Available From ERIC 

Online

In the Library

Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

Details Collect From
mc 2253 ED296702 Temporarily unavailable for request - contact staff
This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

Order a copy

- Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.