National Library of Australia

<< Previous record  /  Next record >>
Record 155 of 4154
You must be logged in to Tag Records
Reactions to Others' Intimacy [microform] / David E. Neufeldt and Evanelle J. Olinger
Bib ID 5509526
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Neufeldt, David E
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1989 
11 p. 
Summary

Research using behavioral measures has indicated that men react less positively to the touch of a same sex individual than women, that both men and women react more positively to the touch of an opposite sex individual than to the touch of a same sex individual, and that men and women do not differ in their reactions to opposite sex touch. This study was undertaken to determine whether these findings would hold true using attitudinal measures (observing someone being touched rather than actually being touched). Subjects were 15 male and 15 female employees of a data processing service. Subjects examined a photograph of a man and woman standing at a normal conversation distance and were told to consider this photograph as a 4 on a 1 to 7 scale. Subjects were shown eight additional photographs and asked to rate them as being more negative or positive than the first photograph. These photographs varied by gender of individuals in the photograph and by degree of touching (shaking hands, hugging). Findings were consistent with previous behavioral studies in that high intimacy appeared to be more pleasant in the eyes of others when the participants were of the opposite sex than when they were of the same sex. Reactions to same sex intimacy was affected by the sex of the observer and high same sex intimacy led to less positive ratings than did low same sex intimacy. The significant findings were due to hugging males being viewed more negatively by males than any other type of interaction. The results support the contention that people hold a less conservative attitude when observing others interact in a touching situation than when they are the object of the touch. (NB)

Notes

ERIC Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Southwestern Psychological Association (35th, Houston, TX, April 13-15, 1989).

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Adults.  |  Employee Attitudes.  |  Interpersonal Relationship.  |  Intimacy.  |  Responses.  |  Sex Differences.
Form/genre Reports, Research.  |  Speeches/Meeting Papers.
Other authors/contributors Olinger, Evanelle J., author
Available From ERIC 

Online

In the Library

Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

Details Collect From
mc 2253 ED312590 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

Order a copy

- Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.