National Library of Australia

You must be logged in to Tag Records
Post-Traumatic Stress [microform] : What Some Indian Youth and Vietnam Veterans Have in Common. How Can We Help?
Bib ID 5527112
Format MicroformMicroform, BookBook
Author
Native American Development Corp., Washington, DC
 
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1990 
20 p. 
Summary

Stress can make a person more apt to abuse alcohol and drugs. Based on interviews with Phil Tingley, president of the National Indian Social Workers Association, this booklet suggests that some Native American youth are victims of a special kind of stress--post-traumatic stress (PTS). PTS symptoms are delayed mental and physical responses to severe trauma. Secondary PTS may affect individuals close to someone affected by severe trauma. For the past five generations, Native Americans have experienced one cultural and individual trauma after another. Many Indian youth are caught up in an accelerating spiral of pain and despair. New primary traumas occur as negative behaviors generated by PTS take their toll. The desire for relief increases, and alcohol and drugs offer escape. To deal with PTS, Native Americans, as a community, must allow themselves to experience the grief process. Grieving often leads to anger and a search to establish blame, but this process can result in accepting and forgiving the behavior of oneself and others and focusing on healthy choices for the future. Indian communities have the power to heal themselves by drawing on traditional cultural practices for confronting problems. As trauma is confronted, the release may be explosive and help may be necessary. Resources are available within the tribe. Community events and ceremonies that strengthen tribal and family support networks can significantly help people struggling with PTS. (SV)

Notes

Availability: Native American Development Corporation, 1000 Connecticut Ave., NW, Suite 1206, Washington, DC 20036.

Sponsoring Agency: Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, Washington, DC. School Improvement Programs.

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects American Indians.  |  Community Action.  |  Community Problems.  |  Community Resources.  |  Grief.  |  Social Support Groups.  |  Stress Variables.  |  Substance Abuse.  |  Tribes.  |  Youth.  |  Native Americans Posttraumatic Stress Disorder  |  Healing Support Systems
Form/genre Opinion Papers.
Other authors/contributors Native American Development Corp., Washington, DC
Available From ERIC 

Online

    In the Library

    Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

    Details Collect From
    mc 2253 ED328388 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
    This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

    Order a copy

    - Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

    Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
    close Can I borrow items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close What can I get online?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
    Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.