National Library of Australia

Due to the need to contain the spread of coronavirus (COVID-19) the Library building and reading rooms are closed to visitors until further notice.
The health and safety of our community is of great importance to us and we look forward to staying connected with you online.

<< Previous record  /  Next record >>
Record 58 of 1780
You must be logged in to Tag Records
Infant's Attention to Objects and Consistency in Linguistic and Non-Linguistic Contexts [microform] / Catharine H. Echols
Bib ID 5537183
Format MicroformMicroform, BookBook
Author
Echols, Catharine H
 
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1991 
13 p. 
Summary

Two studies tested the observation that infants learn to use a "whole object assumption" between the ages of 8 and 15 months, meaning that they expect a word to apply to the whole object to which it refers. The first study investigated the possibility that infants of 8 to 10 months may attend differently, and more selectively, to events that are named than to events that are not. The study also considered what exactly the infants' attention is drawn to. A habituation procedure, in which infants watched a researcher manipulating objects on a stage and a speaker spoke behind the stage, was used. In a 2 x 2 design, half the infants heard the object being labeled and half did not. Half also saw a consistent object undergoing three different motions as opposed to different objects undergoing the same motion. For both motion and objects, infants attended more to what was consistent than to what was not. A second study sought to determine whether this tendency was stronger in infants who were learning language at 13 to 15 months. It was found that the older infants looked longer at a novel object regardless of whether it was in the consistent motion or the consistent object condition, and regardless of whether it was labeled or unlabeled. Five references and six charts are appended. (SAK)

Notes

ERIC Note: Paper presented at the Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (Seattle, WA, April 18-20, 1991).

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Age Differences.  |  Associative Learning.  |  Attention.  |  Cognitive Development.  |  Developmental Stages.  |  Infants.  |  Language Acquisition.  |  Labeling (of Objects)
Form/genre Speeches/Meeting Papers.  |  Reports, Research.
Available From ERIC 

Online

    In the Library

    Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

    Details Collect From
    mc 2253 ED338377 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
    This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

    Order a copy

    - Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

    Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
    close Can I borrow items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close What can I get online?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
    Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.