National Library of Australia

Enjoy a CovidSafe visit to the National Library. Read more...

<< Previous record  /  Next record >>
Record 9 of 47
You must be logged in to Tag Records
Language Policy in the Context of Realizing Human Rights and Maximizing National Development [microform] / D. E. Ingram
Bib ID 5542043
Format MicroformMicroform, BookBook
Author
Ingram, D. E
 
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1991 
14 p. 
Summary

A discussion of the relationship between public policy on languages and national economic development focuses on formulation of policy, especially in the case of Australia. It begins with a brief history of language policy-making in that country since the 1960s, including early proposals and a 1990 report that has been adopted as a basis for Queensland language policy. The second section examines two primary factors motivating development of national language policy: national economic development in the international context, and human rights. Reference is made to the Universal Declaration of Language Rights, a document in the process of being developed by the World Federation of Modern Language Teachers. A third section looks at the nature of policy-making as a decision making or problem solving process, both for the parent discipline of applied linguistics and for language policy-making or language-in-education planning. Finally, the structure of language policy is examined, and six essential elements of rational language policy are outlined. Salient features of Queensland language policy and corollary needs based on Queensland social needs are identified. Other aspects of the Queensland policy are also discussed briefly. It is concluded that improved, rational, systematic language policy-making, realized in sound language-in-education policy, is a priority for the 1990s. (MSE)

Notes

ERIC Note: Paper presented at a meeting of United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization experts (Nathan, Queensland, Australia, March 20, 1991). Figures and appendix not included in copy received by ERIC.

Policymakers.

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Civil Liberties.  |  Economic Development.  |  Foreign Countries.  |  Language Role.  |  Languages.  |  Policy Formation.  |  Public Policy.  |  Australia Language Policy
Form/genre Reports, Evaluative.  |  Opinion Papers.  |  Speeches/Meeting Papers.
Available From ERIC 

Online

    In the Library

    Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

    Details Collect From
    mc 2253 ED343374 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
    This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

    Order a copy

    - Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

    Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
    close Can I borrow items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close What can I get online?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
    Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.