National Library of Australia

<< Previous record  /  Next record >>
Record 2 of 41
You must be logged in to Tag Records
Valuing Student Texts [microform] : Students Valuing Texts / Michael F. McClure
Bib ID 5543872
Format MicroformMicroform, BookBook
Author
McClure, Michael F
 
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1992 
10 p. 
Summary

Being a teacher of writing carries certain ideological implications, not the least of which is the fact that the teacher must participate in and perpetuate an educational system which works effects in and upon society that are repugnant. Overall, teachers work to maintain a status quo that shrugs its shoulders at many inequalities and injustices of race, gender, class, etc. As a group, writing instructors are highly idealistic people, allowing them to continue to strive even in conditions as they now stand. The goal of writing instruction, "literacy," is itself embedded in ideology, so that no single conception of "literacy" serves all cultural groups. Accordingly, when monolithic conceptions of education remain unquestioned, it is discouraging, if not downright frightening. Theories embracing the notion of "discourse conventions," such as that of David Bartholomae, actually encourage students to submit to existing social and political power relationships, and betray elitist and sexist stances. In contrast to the "discourse conventions" position are stances which acknowledge the "discussion of difference" in constructive ways, such as Donald Murray's emphasis on personal codes and the autobiographical nature of all writing. As Nancy Sommers has contended, the kinds of writing that students are encouraged to produce has been artificially limited, largely through the oppressive nature of contemporary institutions. Thus teachers must value students' purposes, perspectives, and texts if they hope to convince them to value the texts of others. (HB)

Notes

ERIC Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Conference on College Composition and Communication (43rd, Cincinnati, OH, March 19-21, 1992).

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Higher Education.  |  Politics of Education.  |  Teacher Student Relationship.  |  Writing (Composition)  |  Writing Instruction.  |  Composition Theory  |  Bartholomae (David) Expressive Writing Murray (Donald M)
Form/genre Speeches/Meeting Papers.  |  Opinion Papers.
Available From ERIC 

Online

    In the Library

    Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

    Details Collect From
    mc 2253 ED345250 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
    This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

    Order a copy

    - Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

    Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
    close Can I borrow items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close What can I get online?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
    Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.