National Library of Australia

We’re delighted to be able to increase our reading room services and opening hours. Read more...

<< Previous record  /  Next record >>
Record 9 of 140
You must be logged in to Tag Records
Nongraded and Mixed-Age Grouping in Early Childhood Programs [microform] / Lilian G. Katz
Bib ID 5551639
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Katz, Lilian G
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1992 
3 p. 
Series

ERIC Digest.

Summary

A confusing variety of terms is used in discussions of age grouping practices. This digest examines terms that have important implications for teaching and the curriculum. The terms "nongraded" and "ungraded" typically refer to grouping children in classes without grade-level designations and with more than a 1-year age span. The term "combined classes" refers to the inclusion of more than one grade level in a classroom. The term "continuous progress" generally implies that children remain with their classroom peers in an age cohort regardless of whether they have met prespecified grade-level achievement expectations. The terms "mixed-age" and "multi-age grouping" refer to grouping children so that the age span of the class is greater than 1 year, as in the nongraded or ungraded approach. These terms are used to emphasize the goal of using teaching practices that maximize the benefits of cooperation among children of various ages. The distinctions between the grouping practices have significant implications for practice. The ungraded approach acknowledges that age is a crude indicator of children's readiness to learn. Mixed-age grouping takes advantage of children's heterogeneous experiences. Research indicates that, in spite of its risks, the potential advantages of mixed-age grouping outweigh its disadvantages. (BC)

Notes

Sponsoring Agency: Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC.

Contract Number: RI88062012.

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Continuous Progress Plan.  |  Definitions.  |  Developmentally Appropriate Practices.  |  Early Childhood Education.  |  Heterogeneous Grouping.  |  Mixed Age Grouping.  |  Multigraded Classes.  |  Nongraded Instructional Grouping.  |  Peer Relationship.  |  Teaching Methods.  |  Young Children.  |  ERIC Digests
Form/genre ERIC Publications.  |  ERIC Digests in Full Text.
Other authors/contributors ERIC Clearinghouse on Urban Education
Available From ERIC 

Online

In the Library

Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

Details Collect From
mc 2253 ED351148 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

Order a copy

- Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.