National Library of Australia

We’re delighted to be able to re-open the Library for pre-booked ticketed access to our collections. Read more...

Next record >>
Record 1 of 3
You must be logged in to Tag Records
Occupational Stress and Burnout in Educational Administration [microform] / Joseph A. Torelli and Walter H. Gmelch
Bib ID 5553159
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Torelli, Joseph A
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1992 
38 p. 
Summary

Stress intrigues and plagues academic and practicing school administrators alike. This paper profiles McGrath's (1976) social-psychological stress process which consists of four stages, and Gmelch's (1988) similar four-stage cycle. A study investigated the relationship between Stage I and Stage IV of the four-stage stress cycle and the influence of an intervening variable, sex roles, on each of the two stages. Three research questions were investigated: (1) To what extent do administrative stress and burnout vary among levels of administration in education? (2) To what extent do administrative stress factors contribute to the dimensions of burnout? and (3) What is the association between sex-role orientation and administrative stress and burnout? Principals and superintendents (N=1,000) in Washington State were randomly selected and stratified to participate in this study. Each was sent the Administrative Work Inventory instrument. Seven hundred and forty administrators responded for a 74 percent return rate. Of the returned surveys, only 655 were fully completed. A variety of qualitative statistical methods were used. Results for each research question are given. Findings include a definite pattern between sex roles and administrator stress and burnout. The androgynous principals and superintendents perceive less stressful situations and burnout than other sex-role classifications. Statistical tables are appended. (Contains 29 references.) (RR)

Notes

ERIC Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (San Francisco, CA, April 20-24, 1992).

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Burnout.  |  Educational Administration.  |  Elementary Secondary Education.  |  Occupational Surveys.  |  Principals.  |  Sex Role.  |  Stress Variables.  |  Superintendents.
Form/genre Reports, Research.  |  Speeches/Meeting Papers.
Other authors/contributors Gmelch, Walter H., author
Available From ERIC 

Online

In the Library

Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

Details Collect From
mc 2253 ED352698 Temporarily unavailable for request - contact staff
This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

Order a copy

- Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.