National Library of Australia

<< Previous record  /  Next record >>
Record 6 of 24
You must be logged in to Tag Records
How Much Are Schools Spending? [microform] : A 50-State Examination of Expenditure Patterns over the Last Decade / John Augenblick and Others
Bib ID 5557753
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Augenblick, John
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1993 
51 p. 
Summary

Since publication of "A Nation at Risk" in 1983, state and local expenditures for education have increased significantly, from $108.4 billion a decade ago to $210.4 billion by 1991-92. On average, per-pupil spending for 1991-92 was more than $1,250, or 30 percent, above the level required to keep pace with inflation during the 1980s. State per-pupil support increased an average of $95 per year above inflation through 1990-91. Similarly, local per-pupil support increased about $99 per year above inflation through 1989-90. In most states, the increased expenditures went toward higher salaries and to improve teacher-student ratios. Several factors influenced spending levels for different expenditures: strength of state and local economies, changes in enrollment, voter attitudes, school-finance legislation, and funding competition between schools and other social services. By 1991-92, state expenditures for education were lagging behind inflation. Local support, by 1989-90, barely matched inflation. Thus, if the findings of "A Nation at Risk" led to increased education spending, the effect either wore off or was overwhelmed by other factors. Included in an appendix are 10 tables on different aspects of per-pupil expenditure, state support, local support, instructional staff salaries, instructional staff-pupil ratios, and state cost-of-living indices. (JPT)

Notes

Availability: ECS Distribution Center, 707 17th Street, Suite 2700, Denver, CO 80202-3427 (Stock No. SF-93-2: $7.50; quantity discounts).

Sponsoring Agency: Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, New York, NY.

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Educational Finance.  |  Elementary Secondary Education.  |  Expenditure per Student.  |  Expenditures.  |  Financial Support.  |  Public Schools.  |  Salaries.  |  School District Spending.  |  School Funds.  |  State Aid.  |  State School District Relationship.  |  State Surveys.
Form/genre Reports, Research.
Other authors/contributors Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO
Available From ERIC 

Online

In the Library

Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

Details Collect From
mc 2253 ED357442 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

Order a copy

- Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.