National Library of Australia

You must be logged in to Tag Records
Women, Human Development, and Learning [microform] / Sandra Kerka
Bib ID 5558638
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Kerka, Sandra
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1993 
4 p. 
Series

ERIC Digest.

Summary

A growing body of literature is questioning whether existing models of human development apply equally to men and women. Prevailing theories of human development have been criticized for being based on research with primarily male subjects of similar ethnic, racial, or class backgrounds. Some research supports the viewpoint that women have different ways of thinking and learning. However, emphasizing the "differentness" of women raises the danger of stereotyping and/or perpetuating traditional sex roles. Others argue that identifying the "different voices" of women may have the positive result of validating other perspectives. If educational institutions are based on a model of one type of thought (rational, analytic), then those whose ways of thinking are more subjective or inductive may feel alienated in the learning environment. Several ways of using knowledge of developmental differences to support adult learning have been identified. The approaches that have been suggested for enhancing women's "different" ways of developing are remarkably similar to the central principles of adult education: teaching and learning that are collaborative and reflective, social action and social change, and validation and use of the life experiences adults bring to the classroom in the teaching/learning process. (Contains 14 references.) (MN)

Notes

Sponsoring Agency: Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC.

Contract Number: RR93002001.

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Adult Development.  |  Adult Education.  |  Adult Learning.  |  Classroom Techniques.  |  Cognitive Style.  |  Educational Research.  |  Females.  |  Individual Development.  |  Psychological Studies.  |  Sex Differences.  |  Theory Practice Relationship.  |  ERIC Digests
Form/genre ERIC Publications.  |  ERIC Digests in Full Text.
Other authors/contributors ERIC Clearinghouse on Adult, Career, and Vocational Education
Available From ERIC 
000 03019cam a22004452u 4500
001 5558638
005 20181012145914.0
007 he u||024||||
008 080220s1993    xxu ||| b     ||| | eng d
035 |9(ericd)ED358379
037 |aED358379|bERIC
040 |aericd|beng|cericd|dMvI
088 |aEDO-CE-93-139
100 1 |aKerka, Sandra.
245 1 0 |aWomen, Human Development, and Learning|h[microform] /|cSandra Kerka.
260 |a[Washington, D.C.] :|bDistributed by ERIC Clearinghouse,|c1993.
300 |a4 p.
490 0 |aERIC Digest.
500 |aSponsoring Agency: Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC.|5ericd
500 |aContract Number: RR93002001.|5ericd
520 |aA growing body of literature is questioning whether existing models of human development apply equally to men and women. Prevailing theories of human development have been criticized for being based on research with primarily male subjects of similar ethnic, racial, or class backgrounds. Some research supports the viewpoint that women have different ways of thinking and learning. However, emphasizing the "differentness" of women raises the danger of stereotyping and/or perpetuating traditional sex roles. Others argue that identifying the "different voices" of women may have the positive result of validating other perspectives. If educational institutions are based on a model of one type of thought (rational, analytic), then those whose ways of thinking are more subjective or inductive may feel alienated in the learning environment. Several ways of using knowledge of developmental differences to support adult learning have been identified. The approaches that have been suggested for enhancing women's "different" ways of developing are remarkably similar to the central principles of adult education: teaching and learning that are collaborative and reflective, social action and social change, and validation and use of the life experiences adults bring to the classroom in the teaching/learning process. (Contains 14 references.) (MN)
530 |aMay also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: |uhttps://eric.ed.gov/
533 |aMicrofiche.|b[Washington D.C.]:|cERIC Clearinghouse|emicrofiches : positive.
650 0 7 |aAdult Development.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aAdult Education.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aAdult Learning.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aClassroom Techniques.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aCognitive Style.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aEducational Research.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aFemales.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aIndividual Development.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aPsychological Studies.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aSex Differences.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aTheory Practice Relationship.|2ericd
653 0 |aERIC Digests
655 7 |aERIC Publications.|2ericd
655 7 |aERIC Digests in Full Text.|2ericd
710 2 |aERIC Clearinghouse on Adult, Career, and Vocational Education.
856 4 1 |uhttps://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED358379
984 |aANL|cmc 2253 ED358379|d77000000365878
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.