National Library of Australia

<< Previous record  /  Next record >>
Record 4 of 41
You must be logged in to Tag Records
Rehearsing New Subject Positions [microform] : A Poststructural Look at Expressive Writing / Sara Dalmas Jonsberg
Bib ID 5558698
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Jonsberg, Sara Dalmas
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1993 
13 p. 
Summary

Poststructural theory grapples with the hiddenness and complexity of oppression by questioning Western understandings of the self as a unitary, self-created, autonomous, essentialist entity. Feminist psychologists have shown that autonomy as a measure of maturity implies that women will never "grow up" because women's lives tend to be anchored in webs of relationships. In deconstructing the traditional model of self, poststructuralism suggests that selfhood is defined by social forces expressed in discourse. With the old model of self, expressive writing was about discovering the essential self. According to a poststructuralist model, expressive writing may be seen more as an examination of oneself in relation to social discourses. For students in an open admissions setting, even an elementary sort of academic discourse is a long-range goal rather than a present condition. The narrative of a high school drop-out reveals the process of his developing a new relationship toward a history of academic failure which he had previously internalized. The narrative of a young mother married to a drug addict discloses the process of her realization that the happy-ever-after fairy tales which led her to see her husband as a prince regardless of his behavior are deceptive models of married life. For these students, writing is a way of rehearsing new subject positions. It is the writing instructor's task to help students discover the possibility of challenge and resistance writing can provide. (Portion of student essay attached.) (SAM)

Notes

ERIC Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Conference on College Composition and Communication (44th, San Diego, CA, March 31-April 3, 1993).

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Basic Writing.  |  Discourse Communities.  |  Higher Education.  |  Open Enrollment.  |  Self Actualization.  |  Theory Practice Relationship.  |  Expressive Writing  |  Basic Writers Poststructuralism Self Recognition
Form/genre Opinion Papers.  |  Speeches/Meeting Papers.
Available From ERIC 

Online

In the Library

Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

Details Collect From
mc 2253 ED358447 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

Order a copy

- Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.