National Library of Australia

You must be logged in to Tag Records
Educational and Developmental Belief Systems among African-American Parents of Kindergarten Children [microform] / Marion C. Hyson and Candace DeCsipkes
Bib ID 5564207
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Hyson, Marion C
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1993 
33 p. 
Summary

By describing the characteristics of the educational and developmental belief systems of low-income African-American parents of kindergarten children, this study extended previous research on parents' beliefs about early education and development to more ethnically and socioeconomically diverse subject groups. A sample of 115 African-American mothers and other primary caregivers of kindergarten children completed a version of the Educational Attitude Scale and reported their intended involvement in home and school learning activities. Follow-up interviews were conducted with 21 parents. Regardless of their own educational level, participants favored adult-directed, formally academic strategies for promoting children's learning and development. Behavioral expectations were especially high for African-American boys, particularly among less educated parents. Positive correlations between sets of items describing developmentally inappropriate and appropriate practices reflected a tendency to approve of both formal, paper-and-pencil learning and informal, concrete methods. This response pattern contrasts with patterns identified in previous research with affluent white parents and early childhood teachers, who made sharp distinctions between these educational approaches. Results suggest that most African-American parents support all attempts to enhance their children's learning and that theoretical distinctions are not salient. (MM)

Notes

ERIC Note: Paper presented at the Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (70th, New Orleans, LA, March 25-28, 1993).

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Black Mothers.  |  Child Behavior.  |  Child Caregivers.  |  Child Development.  |  Developmentally Appropriate Practices.  |  Kindergarten Children.  |  Learning Strategies.  |  Parent Attitudes.  |  Parent Participation.  |  Primary Education.  |  Theory Practice Relationship.  |  Parent Expectations  |  African Americans
Form/genre Speeches/Meeting Papers.  |  Reports, Research.
Other authors/contributors DeCsipkes, Candace, author
Available From ERIC 

Online

In the Library

Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

Details Collect From
mc 2253 ED364336 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

Order a copy

- Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.