National Library of Australia

You must be logged in to Tag Records
Self-Directed Learning. Myths and Realities [microform] / Sandra Kerka
Bib ID 5566286
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Kerka, Sandra
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1994 
4 p. 
Summary

In addition to the cult mystique that the notion of self-directed learning (SDL) has attained, controversy has arisen over its definition, its proper environment, and other issues. Consequently, a number of issues have arisen. The first is that adults are naturally self-directed. The reality is that adults' reactions to and capability for SDL vary widely. SDL may be a lifelong phenomenon in which adults differ from other adults and from children in degree: some people are or are not self-directed learners; some people are or are not in different situations. The second myth is that self-direction is an all-or-nothing concept. Again, instead of the extremes of learner- versus other-direction, it is apparent a continuum exists. Adults have varying degrees of willingness or ability to assume personal responsibility for learning. Elements of the continuum may include the degree of choice over goals, objectives, type of participation, content, method, and assessment. The third myth is that self-directed learning means learning in isolation. The essential dimension of SDL may be psychological control, which a learner can exert in solitary, informal, or traditional settings. In other words, solitude is not a necessary condition. Educators seeking to develop the capacity for self-direction in learners will need to consider a number of dimensions: an expanded definition of SDL, SDL as characterized by factors along a continuum, and SDL as involving an internal change in consciousness. (Contains 14 references.) (YLB)

Notes

Sponsoring Agency: Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC.

Contract Number: RR93002001.

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Adult Education.  |  Adult Learning.  |  Andragogy.  |  Educational Theories.  |  Independent Study.  |  Learning Motivation.  |  Learning Strategies.  |  Learning Theories.  |  Misconceptions.  |  Self Determination.
Form/genre ERIC Publications.
Other authors/contributors ERIC Clearinghouse on Adult, Career, and Vocational Education
Available From ERIC 
000 03030cam a22003972u 4500
001 5566286
005 20181012144832.0
007 he u||024||||
008 080220s1994    xxu ||| b     ||| | eng d
035 |9(ericd)ED365818
037 |aED365818|bERIC
040 |aericd|beng|cericd|dMvI
091 |amfm
100 1 |aKerka, Sandra.
245 1 0 |aSelf-Directed Learning. Myths and Realities|h[microform] /|cSandra Kerka.
260 |a[Washington, D.C.] :|bDistributed by ERIC Clearinghouse,|c1994.
300 |a4 p.
500 |aSponsoring Agency: Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC.|5ericd
500 |aContract Number: RR93002001.|5ericd
520 |aIn addition to the cult mystique that the notion of self-directed learning (SDL) has attained, controversy has arisen over its definition, its proper environment, and other issues. Consequently, a number of issues have arisen. The first is that adults are naturally self-directed. The reality is that adults' reactions to and capability for SDL vary widely. SDL may be a lifelong phenomenon in which adults differ from other adults and from children in degree: some people are or are not self-directed learners; some people are or are not in different situations. The second myth is that self-direction is an all-or-nothing concept. Again, instead of the extremes of learner- versus other-direction, it is apparent a continuum exists. Adults have varying degrees of willingness or ability to assume personal responsibility for learning. Elements of the continuum may include the degree of choice over goals, objectives, type of participation, content, method, and assessment. The third myth is that self-directed learning means learning in isolation. The essential dimension of SDL may be psychological control, which a learner can exert in solitary, informal, or traditional settings. In other words, solitude is not a necessary condition. Educators seeking to develop the capacity for self-direction in learners will need to consider a number of dimensions: an expanded definition of SDL, SDL as characterized by factors along a continuum, and SDL as involving an internal change in consciousness. (Contains 14 references.) (YLB)
530 |aMay also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: |uhttps://eric.ed.gov/
533 |aMicrofiche.|b[Washington D.C.]:|cERIC Clearinghouse|emicrofiches : positive.
650 0 7 |aAdult Education.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aAdult Learning.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aAndragogy.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aEducational Theories.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aIndependent Study.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aLearning Motivation.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aLearning Strategies.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aLearning Theories.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aMisconceptions.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aSelf Determination.|2ericd
655 7 |aERIC Publications.|2ericd
710 2 |aERIC Clearinghouse on Adult, Career, and Vocational Education.
856 4 1 |uhttps://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED365818
984 |aANL|cmc 2253 ED365818|d77000000372818
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.