National Library of Australia

<< Previous record  /  Next record >>
Record 16 of 127
You must be logged in to Tag Records
Modifications That Preserve Language and Content [microform] / Michael H. Long and Steven Ross
Bib ID 5571623
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Long, Michael H
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1993 
26 p. 
Summary

This article reviews the research on the simplification of reading materials for second language (SL) learners and reports on an experiment of the effects of text simplification and elaboration on the reading comprehension of SL learners. Elaboration can improve the comprehensibility of texts without removing new linguistic forms that students need to learn or diluting the semantic content of the original. A review of the research suggests that linguistic simplification of texts fails on both counts, producing unnatural target language models. A study involving 483 Japanese college students studying English as a Foreign Language (EFL) for at least 8 years was conducted to determine their reading comprehension of unmodified, simplified, and elaborated texts. The study found that students who read the simplified passages scored higher on a multiple-choice comprehension test than students who read the unmodified version. Students who read the elaborated versions of the passages scored higher than those who read the unmodified versions, but not statistically significantly so. It also found that there was no statistically significant difference between the reading scores of students who read the simplified and elaborated versions of the passages. (MDM)

Notes

ERIC Note: In: Tickoo, M. L., Ed. Simplification: Theory and Application. Anthology Series 31; see FL 022 043.

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects College Students.  |  Educational Media.  |  Educational Strategies.  |  English (Second Language)  |  Higher Education.  |  Instructional Materials.  |  Language Attitudes.  |  Language Research.  |  Language Usage.  |  Reading Comprehension.  |  Second Language Instruction.  |  Second Language Learning.  |  Elaboration Simplification (Language)
Form/genre Reports, Research.
Other authors/contributors Ross, Steven, author
Available From ERIC 
000 02905cam a22004212u 4500
001 5571623
005 20181022110603.0
007 he u||024||||
008 080220s1993    xxu ||| bt    ||| | eng d
035 |9(ericd)ED371576
037 |aED371576|bERIC
040 |aericd|beng|cericd|dMvI
091 |amfm
100 1 |aLong, Michael H.
245 1 0 |aModifications That Preserve Language and Content|h[microform] /|cMichael H. Long and Steven Ross.
260 |a[Washington, D.C.] :|bDistributed by ERIC Clearinghouse,|c1993.
300 |a26 p.
500 |aERIC Note: In: Tickoo, M. L., Ed. Simplification: Theory and Application. Anthology Series 31; see FL 022 043.|5ericd
520 |aThis article reviews the research on the simplification of reading materials for second language (SL) learners and reports on an experiment of the effects of text simplification and elaboration on the reading comprehension of SL learners. Elaboration can improve the comprehensibility of texts without removing new linguistic forms that students need to learn or diluting the semantic content of the original. A review of the research suggests that linguistic simplification of texts fails on both counts, producing unnatural target language models. A study involving 483 Japanese college students studying English as a Foreign Language (EFL) for at least 8 years was conducted to determine their reading comprehension of unmodified, simplified, and elaborated texts. The study found that students who read the simplified passages scored higher on a multiple-choice comprehension test than students who read the unmodified version. Students who read the elaborated versions of the passages scored higher than those who read the unmodified versions, but not statistically significantly so. It also found that there was no statistically significant difference between the reading scores of students who read the simplified and elaborated versions of the passages. (MDM)
530 |aMay also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18:|uhttps://eric.ed.gov/
533 |aMicrofiche.|b[Washington D.C.]:|cERIC Clearinghouse|emicrofiches : positive.
650 1 7 |aCollege Students.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aEducational Media.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aEducational Strategies.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aEnglish (Second Language)|2ericd
650 0 7 |aHigher Education.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aInstructional Materials.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aLanguage Attitudes.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aLanguage Research.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aLanguage Usage.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aReading Comprehension.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aSecond Language Instruction.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aSecond Language Learning.|2ericd
653 1 |aElaboration|aSimplification (Language)
655 7 |aReports, Research.|2ericd
700 1 |aRoss, Steven,|eauthor.
856 4 1 |uhttps://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED371576
984 |aANL|cmc 2253 ED371576|d77000000378024
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.