National Library of Australia

You must be logged in to Tag Records
Carjacking in Australia [electronic resource] : recording issues and future directions / Lisa Jane Young and Maria Borzycki
Bib ID 5599004
Format BookBook, OnlineOnline
Author
Young, Lisa Jane
 
Online Access
Online Versions
Description Canberra : Australian Institute of Criminology, 2008 
6 p. 
ISBN 9781921185724
Series

Trends and issues in crime and criminal justice (Online) ; no. 351.

PANDORA electronic collection.

Technical Details

Mode of access: Internet via World Wide Web. Address as at 25/08/2011: http://www.aic.gov.au/publications/current%20series/tandi/341-360/tandi351.aspx. 

Summary

The term carjacking is commonly understood as vehicle theft involving threat, violence or intimidation. However, this has yet to be clarified within most legislative or offence definitions. Carjacking literature is limited, and perceptions vary about the level of violence involved, diverse scenarios and the motivations of offenders. The media tends to over-represent carjackings involving weapons and violence, although these are relatively rare incidents. Motivations range from instrumental triggers (where the car is used in some other crime) to acquisition for onselling the car or its parts. Similarly, methods vary from opportunistic to organised theft involving support. This paper examines increased carjacking in Australia, the United Kingdom, the United States and South Africa reported through the literature. Victimisation surveys currently may be the most appropriate source for collecting carjacking estimates. Offence definitions and recording practices vary between Australian jurisdictions, making accurate estimates. Local socioeconomic and cultural factors, such as firearm availability, are also discussed in the context of probable future trends in Australia.

Notes

Title from caption of PDF document (viewed Aug. 25, 2011)

"February 2008".

Includes bibliographical references (p. 6)

Text and graphics.

Also available in print.

Selected for archiving

Subjects Carjacking -- Australia.  |  Automobile theft -- Australia.  |  Motor vehicles  |  Theft  |  Motivation  |  Notification and reporting  |  Australia overseas comparisons
Other authors/contributors Borzycki, Maria  |  Australian Institute of Criminology
Terms of Use Australian Institute of Criminology 2008. 
000 03124cam a2200493 a 4500
001 5599004
005 20181107165144.0
006 m     o  d f      
007 cr mn ---unn|n
008 080312s2008    acaa    sb   f000 0 eng d
019 1 |a46258183
020 |a9781921185724
035 |a(OCoLC)682903293
040 |aAPAR|beng|dANL
042 |aanuc
043 |au-at---
082 0 4 |a364.1620994|223
100 1 |aYoung, Lisa Jane.
245 1 0 |aCarjacking in Australia|h[electronic resource] :|brecording issues and future directions /|cLisa Jane Young and Maria Borzycki.
260 |aCanberra :|bAustralian Institute of Criminology,|c2008.
300 |a6 p.
490 1 |aTrends & issues in crime and criminal justice ;|vno. 351
500 |aTitle from caption of PDF document (viewed Aug. 25, 2011)
500 |a"February 2008".
504 |aIncludes bibliographical references (p. 6)
516 |aText and graphics.
520 3 |aThe term carjacking is commonly understood as vehicle theft involving threat, violence or intimidation. However, this has yet to be clarified within most legislative or offence definitions. Carjacking literature is limited, and perceptions vary about the level of violence involved, diverse scenarios and the motivations of offenders. The media tends to over-represent carjackings involving weapons and violence, although these are relatively rare incidents. Motivations range from instrumental triggers (where the car is used in some other crime) to acquisition for onselling the car or its parts. Similarly, methods vary from opportunistic to organised theft involving support. This paper examines increased carjacking in Australia, the United Kingdom, the United States and South Africa reported through the literature. Victimisation surveys currently may be the most appropriate source for collecting carjacking estimates. Offence definitions and recording practices vary between Australian jurisdictions, making accurate estimates. Local socioeconomic and cultural factors, such as firearm availability, are also discussed in the context of probable future trends in Australia.
530 |aAlso available in print.
538 |aMode of access: Internet via World Wide Web. Address as at 25/08/2011: http://www.aic.gov.au/publications/current%20series/tandi/341-360/tandi351.aspx.
540 |aAustralian Institute of Criminology 2008.
583 |aSelected for archiving|5ANL
650 0 |aCarjacking|zAustralia.
650 0 |aAutomobile theft|zAustralia.
653 |aMotor vehicles
653 |aTheft
653 |aMotivation
653 |aNotification and reporting
653 |aAustralia overseas comparisons
700 1 |aBorzycki, Maria.
710 2 |aAustralian Institute of Criminology.
830 0 |aTrends and issues in crime and criminal justice (Online) ;|vno. 351.
830 0 |aPANDORA electronic collection.
856 4 0 |zClick here to access full text via publisher website|uhttp://www.aic.gov.au/publications/current%20series/tandi/341-360/tandi351.aspx
856 4 1 |zArchived at ANL|uhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.arc-10850
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.