National Library of Australia

You must be logged in to Tag Records
Investigating Young Children's Home Technological Language and Experience [microform] / Marilyn Fleer
Bib ID 5604550
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Fleer, Marilyn
 
Online Versions
Description [S.l.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1996 
19 p. 
Summary

Technology education as a key learning area can be viewed as the designing, making, and appraising of systems, materials, and information. This study examined young Australian children's technological experiences prior to beginning school in order to build on their learning base in curriculum planning. The purposes of the research were to: (1) investigate the range of home experiences young children have in planning, making, and appraising activities and products; (2) study whether and which home experiences influence children's approaches and abilities to plan technological activities; and (3) suggest ways of building on children's natural planning techniques to enhance, develop, and widen their planning strategies. Data were collected through interviews with 12 children (mean age of 4 years, 3 months) attending a preschool and child care center. Results indicated that children were able to outline how they spent their days and how decisions were made regarding the day's events. They showed varying levels of understanding regarding planning. Children participated in a range of home activities where they made things, mostly with materials rather than with information or systems, and usually focusing on people and home maintenance. Information technologies were most often associated with passive viewing or receiving; for example, children listened to tapes and did not construct their own audio tapes. Most planning activities occurred orally, with some two-dimensional activities such as writing a shopping list. Children did not understand the concept of appraisal so this area could not be assessed. (Contains 13 references.) (KDFB)

Notes

ERIC Note: In: Australian Research in Early Childhood Education. Volume 1, 1996; see PS 025 254.

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Curriculum Design.  |  Curriculum Development.  |  Early Experience.  |  Family Environment.  |  Family School Relationship.  |  Foreign Countries.  |  Planning.  |  Preschool Children.  |  Preschool Education.  |  Technology.  |  Australia
Form/genre Reports, Research.  |  Speeches/Meeting Papers.
Available From ERIC 
000 03136cam a22003972u 4500
001 5604550
005 20181019101502.0
007 he u||024||||
008 080220s1996    xxu ||| bt    ||| | eng d
035 |9(ericd)ED406034
037 |aED406034|bERIC
040 |aericd|beng|cericd|dMvI
091 |amfm
100 1 |aFleer, Marilyn.
245 1 0 |aInvestigating Young Children's Home Technological Language and Experience|h[microform] /|cMarilyn Fleer.
260 |a[S.l.] :|bDistributed by ERIC Clearinghouse,|c1996.
300 |a19 p.
500 |aERIC Note: In: Australian Research in Early Childhood Education. Volume 1, 1996; see PS 025 254.|5ericd
520 |aTechnology education as a key learning area can be viewed as the designing, making, and appraising of systems, materials, and information. This study examined young Australian children's technological experiences prior to beginning school in order to build on their learning base in curriculum planning. The purposes of the research were to: (1) investigate the range of home experiences young children have in planning, making, and appraising activities and products; (2) study whether and which home experiences influence children's approaches and abilities to plan technological activities; and (3) suggest ways of building on children's natural planning techniques to enhance, develop, and widen their planning strategies. Data were collected through interviews with 12 children (mean age of 4 years, 3 months) attending a preschool and child care center. Results indicated that children were able to outline how they spent their days and how decisions were made regarding the day's events. They showed varying levels of understanding regarding planning. Children participated in a range of home activities where they made things, mostly with materials rather than with information or systems, and usually focusing on people and home maintenance. Information technologies were most often associated with passive viewing or receiving; for example, children listened to tapes and did not construct their own audio tapes. Most planning activities occurred orally, with some two-dimensional activities such as writing a shopping list. Children did not understand the concept of appraisal so this area could not be assessed. (Contains 13 references.) (KDFB)
530 |aMay also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18:|uhttps://eric.ed.gov/
533 |aMicrofiche.|b[Washington D.C.]:|cERIC Clearinghouse|emicrofiches : positive.
650 0 7 |aCurriculum Design.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aCurriculum Development.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aEarly Experience.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aFamily Environment.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aFamily School Relationship.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aForeign Countries.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aPlanning.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aPreschool Children.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aPreschool Education.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aTechnology.|2ericd
653 0 |aAustralia
655 7 |aReports, Research.|2ericd
655 7 |aSpeeches/Meeting Papers.|2ericd
856 4 1 |uhttps://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED406034
984 |aANL|cmc 2253 ED406034|d77000000409094
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.