National Library of Australia

Enjoy a CovidSafe visit to the National Library. Read more...

You must be logged in to Tag Records
Student Dress Codes [microform] / Donald F. Uerling
Bib ID 5609445
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Uerling, Donald F
 
Online Versions
Description [S.l.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1997 
39 p. 
Summary

School officials see a need for regulations that prohibit disruptive and inappropriate forms of expression and attire; students see these regulations as unwanted restrictions on their freedom. This paper reviews court litigation involving constitutional limitations on school authority, dress and hair codes, state law constraints, and school uniforms. It concludes that school officials have authority to regulate student appearance; however, that authority must be exercised within the bounds of the Constitution and any pertinent state law. At some point, school officials can and should impose some restrictions on student appearance; the question is whether the regulation at issue is both legally sound and practical in application. Student dress codes are common but highly variable. Courts will support student dress and grooming code provisions that are necessary to maintain an educational environment that is free from substantial distractions and disruptions. Courts, however, will not support regulations of student appearance that reflect little more than officials' personal preferences. Regulations of hair style are more difficult to justify than regulations of attire. During recent years, however, hair codes have seldom been contested, while dress codes have often been at issue because of gang problems and inappropriate messages on clothing. Policies that regulate explicit forms of expression are more easily justified than those that regulate symbolic forms. Finally, regulations pertaining to student appearance should be sufficiently specific to provide notice to those subject to the regulations and guidance to administrators, yet be sufficiently general to allow for some administrative discretion. (Author/LMI)

Notes

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Compliance (Legal)  |  Constitutional Law.  |  Court Litigation.  |  Discipline Policy.  |  Dress Codes.  |  Elementary Secondary Education.  |  Freedom of Speech.  |  School Policy.  |  School Uniforms.  |  State Legislation.  |  Student Rights.  |  Student School Relationship.
Form/genre Information Analyses.
Available From ERIC 

Online

In the Library

Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

Details Collect From
mc 2253 ED411577 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

Order a copy

- Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.