National Library of Australia

The National Library Reading Rooms are now open at reduced hours. Find out more to plan your visit.

<< Previous record  /  Next record >>
Record 4 of 151
You must be logged in to Tag Records
Moving from Welfare to Work [microform] : The Experiences of Refugee Women in Illinois
Bib ID 5679932
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Women's Bureau (DOL), Washington, DC
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 1999 
33 p. 
Summary

A study conducted a questionnaire survey of 70 refugee women in Illinois and 2 service provider focus groups to assess the effects of welfare changes on refugee women and to identify barriers to workforce participation. Survey findings were that refugee women in the workforce are concentrated in low-wage jobs and do not earn enough income to move completely off welfare; 54 percent of working refugee women receive no benefits from their employers; limited English proficiency is a major barrier to workforce participation and long-term economic self-sufficiency; level of education alone is not a clear determinant of employability; and refugee women need information on child-care subsidy and more time to prepare for employment. Focus group findings were that ongoing education and training on welfare eligibility rules and implications are needed; English proficiency is the most significant roadblock to employment for both newly arrived and long-term refugees on public assistance; child care is a major barrier to employment for refugee women; refugee women who are long-time United States residents and who continue to receive public assistance are among the most difficult to employ; and welfare reform does not take into account the special needs of refugee women. (Twenty-six figures are included.) (YLB)

Notes

Availability: For full text: http://www.dol.gov/dol/wb/public/info_about_wb/regions/refugee.pdf.

ERIC Note: A joint project with the Illinois Refugee Social Services Consortium.

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Adult Education.  |  Adults.  |  Day Care.  |  Employed Women.  |  Employment Potential.  |  Employment Services.  |  Females.  |  Job Training.  |  Limited English Speaking.  |  Low Income.  |  Refugees.  |  Salary Wage Differentials.  |  State Surveys.  |  Surveys.  |  Wages.  |  Welfare Recipients.  |  Welfare Reform.  |  Welfare Services.  |  Illinois
Form/genre Numerical/Quantitative Data.  |  Reports, Research.
Other authors/contributors Women's Bureau (DOL), Washington, DC
Available From ERIC 

Online

In the Library

Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

Details Collect From
mc 2253 ED452392 Main Reading Room - Newspapers and Family History
This item may be online. Please search the ERIC website prior to requesting this microfiche item.

Order a copy

- Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.