National Library of Australia

<< Previous record  /  Next record >>
Record 205 of 209
You must be logged in to Tag Records
Socialization of Graduate and Professional Students in Higher Education: A Perilous Passage? [microform] : ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report, Volume 28, Number 3. Jossey-Bass Higher and Adult Education Series / John C. Weidman, Darla J. Twale and Elizabeth Leahy Stein
Bib ID 5685492
Format BookBook, MicroformMicroform, OnlineOnline
Author
Weidman, John C
 
Online Versions
Description [Washington, D.C.] : Distributed by ERIC Clearinghouse, 2001 
138 p. 
ISBN 9780787958367
0787958360
ISSN 0884-0040 
Summary

This report on the process of graduate and professional student socialization provides information that can be of use to graduate program faculty and administrators, professional associations, state legislatures, and professional licensing bodies charged with assuring clients that well qualified professional practitioners are being prepared in the nation's universities. It addresses implications of issues raised in current literature for designing more effective graduate programs. Socialization in graduate school refers to the processes through which individuals gain the knowledge, skills, and values necessary for successful entry into a professional career requiring an advanced level of specialized knowledge and skills. The first two sections, "The Professional and Socialization" and "Conceptualizing Socialization in Graduate and Professional Programs," describe the various elements of this socialization process, drawing from research on adult socialization, role acquisition, and career development. The third section, "A Framework for the Socialization of Graduate and Professional Students," presents a conceptual model of graduate and professional student socialization that assumes socialization occurs through an interactive set of stages. The fourth section, "Institutional Culture: Recurrent Themes," illustrates several changing patterns in graduate education that are exerting pressure for reform. The fifth section, "Institutional Culture and Socialization: Differences among Academic Programs," contrasts socialization processes across academic program goals, faculty expectations, and student peer culture. The final section, "Easing the Perilous Passage," discusses modifying the graduate degree program and faculty and administrator roles, increasing diversity, and offering support to students. (Contains 197 references.) (SLD)

Notes

Availability: Jossey-Bass, Publishers, Inc., 350 Sansome Street, San Francisco, CA 94104-1342 ($24 per issue, $108 per year). Tel: 888-378-2537 (Toll Free); Fax: 800-605-2665 (Toll Free); Web site: http://www.josseybass.com.

Sponsoring Agency: Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC.

Contract Number: ED-99-00-0036.

ERIC Note: Published six times a year. For Numbers 1-4, see HE 034 354-357.

May also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18: https://eric.ed.gov/

Reproduction Microfiche. [Washington D.C.]: ERIC Clearinghouse microfiches : positive. 
Subjects Graduate Students.  |  Graduate Study.  |  Higher Education.  |  Models.  |  Professional Education.  |  Socialization.  |  Student Adjustment.
Form/genre Books.  |  ERIC Publications.
Other authors/contributors Twale, Darla J., author  |  Stein, Elizabeth Leahy, author  |  ERIC Clearinghouse on Higher Education  |  George Washington Univ., Washington, DC. Graduate School of Education and Human Development  |  Association for the Study of Higher Education
Available From ERIC 
000 04151cam a22004812u 4500
001 5685492
005 20181018164541.0
007 he u||024||||
008 080220s2001    xxu ||| b     ||| ||eng d
020 |a9780787958367 :|c$24.00
020 |a0787958360 :|c$24.00
022 |a0884-0040
035 |9(ericd)ED457710
037 |aED457710|bERIC
040 |aericd|beng|cericd|dMvI
091 |amfm
100 1 |aWeidman, John C.
245 1 0 |aSocialization of Graduate and Professional Students in Higher Education: A Perilous Passage?|h[microform] :|bASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report, Volume 28, Number 3. Jossey-Bass Higher and Adult Education Series /|cJohn C. Weidman, Darla J. Twale and Elizabeth Leahy Stein.
260 |a[Washington, D.C.] :|bDistributed by ERIC Clearinghouse,|c2001.
300 |a138 p.
500 |aAvailability: Jossey-Bass, Publishers, Inc., 350 Sansome Street, San Francisco, CA 94104-1342 ($24 per issue, $108 per year). Tel: 888-378-2537 (Toll Free); Fax: 800-605-2665 (Toll Free); Web site: http://www.josseybass.com.|5ericd
500 |aSponsoring Agency: Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC.|5ericd
500 |aContract Number: ED-99-00-0036.|5ericd
500 |aERIC Note: Published six times a year. For Numbers 1-4, see HE 034 354-357.|5ericd
520 |aThis report on the process of graduate and professional student socialization provides information that can be of use to graduate program faculty and administrators, professional associations, state legislatures, and professional licensing bodies charged with assuring clients that well qualified professional practitioners are being prepared in the nation's universities. It addresses implications of issues raised in current literature for designing more effective graduate programs. Socialization in graduate school refers to the processes through which individuals gain the knowledge, skills, and values necessary for successful entry into a professional career requiring an advanced level of specialized knowledge and skills. The first two sections, "The Professional and Socialization" and "Conceptualizing Socialization in Graduate and Professional Programs," describe the various elements of this socialization process, drawing from research on adult socialization, role acquisition, and career development. The third section, "A Framework for the Socialization of Graduate and Professional Students," presents a conceptual model of graduate and professional student socialization that assumes socialization occurs through an interactive set of stages. The fourth section, "Institutional Culture: Recurrent Themes," illustrates several changing patterns in graduate education that are exerting pressure for reform. The fifth section, "Institutional Culture and Socialization: Differences among Academic Programs," contrasts socialization processes across academic program goals, faculty expectations, and student peer culture. The final section, "Easing the Perilous Passage," discusses modifying the graduate degree program and faculty and administrator roles, increasing diversity, and offering support to students. (Contains 197 references.) (SLD)
530 |aMay also be available online. Address as at 14/8/18:|uhttps://eric.ed.gov/
533 |aMicrofiche.|b[Washington D.C.]:|cERIC Clearinghouse|emicrofiches : positive.
650 1 7 |aGraduate Students.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aGraduate Study.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aHigher Education.|2ericd
650 0 7 |aModels.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aProfessional Education.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aSocialization.|2ericd
650 1 7 |aStudent Adjustment.|2ericd
655 7 |aBooks.|2ericd
655 7 |aERIC Publications.|2ericd
700 1 |aTwale, Darla J.,|eauthor.
700 1 |aStein, Elizabeth Leahy,|eauthor.
710 2 |aERIC Clearinghouse on Higher Education.
710 2 |aGeorge Washington Univ., Washington, DC. Graduate School of Education and Human Development.
710 2 |aAssociation for the Study of Higher Education.
856 4 1 |uhttps://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED457710
984 |aANL|cmc 2253 ED457710|d77000000455471
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.