National Library of Australia

We’re delighted to be able to re-open the Library for pre-booked ticketed access to our collections. Read more...

<< Previous record  /  Next record >>
Record 7 of 19
You must be logged in to Tag Records
Older but not wiser [electronic resource] : smokers and passive smoking belief / Paul Frijters and Grace Lordan
Bib ID 6099573
Format BookBook, OnlineOnline
Author
Frijters, Paul
 
Online Access
Online Versions
Description Brisbane, Qld. : School of Economics, University of Queensland, 2011 
Series

Discussion paper (University of Queensland. School of Economics : Online) ; 431. 1833-1068

PANDORA electronic collection.

Technical Details

Mode of access: Online. Address as at 11/09/2012: http://www.uq.edu.au/economics/431-older-but-not-wiser-smokers-and-passive-smoking-belief 

System requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader to read PDF file. 

Summary

In recent years the proportion of people who smoke in developed countries has reached a plateau, even though countries like the UK continue to run anti-smoking campaigns. We aim to inform UK policy makers about the effects of anti-smoking campaigns by looking at the beliefs that smokers and non-smokers have about the dangers of passive smoking, with particular interest in whether these beliefs vary amongst smokers of different ages. We envisage two groups of potential smokers. There are the altruists, who are less likely to start to smoke once they are fully aware of the dangers of passive smoking; and there are the non-altruists for whom the effects of passive smoking are an irrelevancy. We hypothesis that anti-smoking campaigns have managed to dissuade the altruists of later generations from ever starting to smoke, but are having no effect on the behavior of the non-altruists and hence the plateau. The older smoking altruists are then captive to their smoking behavior and have to rationalize their smoking behavior by downplaying the effects of passive smoking. Using data from the Health Survey for England we find strong evidence that it is the older smokers who are less prone to believe in the dangers of passive smoking whilst younger smokers essentially have the same beliefs as nonsmokers: a young uneducated smoker is more aware of the dangers of passive smoking than a highly educated older smoker. This conclusion is robust to a number of sensitivity analyses. We conclude that the main effect of current campaigns is the continuing deterrence of potential young altruist smokers.

Notes

Title from title screen (viewed on Sept. 11, 2012)

Includes bibliographical references (p. 23-25)

Text and graphics.

Selected for archiving

Subjects Passive smoking -- Great Britain.  |  Smoking -- Great Britain.  |  Antismoking movement -- Great Britain.  |  Health surveys -- Great Britain.  |  Australian
Other authors/contributors Lordan, Grace  |  University of Queensland. School of Economics

In the Library

Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

Details Collect From
Internet Use 'Online Resources' link in record -

Order a copy

- Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.