National Library of Australia

Enjoy a CovidSafe visit to the National Library. Read more...

You must be logged in to Tag Records
Aboriginal paintings of Drysdale River National Park, Kimberley, Western Australia / David M. Welch
Bib ID 6971010
Format BookBook [text, still image, volume]
Author
Welch, David M. (Maxwell), 1955- author
 
Description Coolalinga, Northern Territory : David M. Welch, [2015] 
©2015 
vi, 322 pages : colour illustrations, colour maps, colour portraits ; 24 cm. 
ISBN 9780987138972 (paperback)
Series

Australian Aboriginal culture series ; no. 10.

Summary

Annotation. Drysdale River National Park is a remote wilderness area of rugged natural bushland, well-watered by numerous creeks and the permanent waters of the Drysdale River, located in Western Australia's far north. It has no marked access roads, walking tracks, signage or facilities of any kind. Visitors must be entirely self-sufficient, and travel within the Park is limited to hiking and canoeing.Amongst its rocky cliffs, gorges and eroded quartzite blocks are numerous overhangs and shelters adorned with Aboriginal cave paintings produced over tens of thousands of years. This art includes some of the best preserved, most spectacular Aboriginal rock art to be found in Australia. The earliest paintings and rock markings, created during an Archaic Period, include depictions of the Tasmanian tiger and Tasmanian devil, now extinct on mainland Australia. Later artists portrayed people wearing elaborate ceremonial costume, described as Tasselled Figures, Bent Knee Figures and Straight Part Figures. Other human figures are engaged in running, hunting and camping scenes. Art styles evolved from curvaceous naturalistic figures to more rigid forms. Then, over the past 6,000 years, they became simplified during the Painted Hand Period, and changed again with the development of the Wandjina Period.

Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Subjects Art, Aboriginal Australian -- Western Australia -- Kimberley Region -- History.  |  Rock paintings -- Western Australia -- Kimberley Region -- History.  |  Painting, Prehistoric -- Western Australia -- Kimberley Region -- History.  |  Artists, Aboriginal Australian -- Western Australia -- Kimberley Region -- Biography.  |  Art - Subjects - Dynamic figures.  |  Art - Art motifs - Human figure.  |  Art - Subjects - Gwion Gwion figures.  |  Settlement and contacts - Explorers.  |  Art - Rock art - Painting.  |  Art - Subjects - Wandjina.  |  Art - Subjects - Ancestral / totemic beings.  |  Drysdale River National Park (W.A.) -- Description and travel.  |  Kimberley District (W.A.) -- Description and travel.  |  Drysdale River (WA East Kimberley SD52-09)  |  Australian

Online

    In the Library

    Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

    Details Collect From
    N 305.8991094 AUS
    Copy: N pbk
    Main Reading Room

    Order a copy

    - Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

    Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
    close Can I borrow items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close What can I get online?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
    Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.