National Library of Australia

 Summer Opening Hours:

Our opening hours will be changing between Tuesday 24 December 2019 and Wednesday 1 January 2020.

All reading rooms will be closed from Christmas Day, reopening on 2 January. But you’ll still be able to visit our Exhibition Galleries, our children’s holiday space, WordPlay, and Bookshop from 9am-5pm (except on Christmas Day).Bookplate café will also be open during this period, but with varied hours.

Be sure to check our Summer Opening Hours before you visit: https://www.nla.gov.au/visit-us/opening-hours

You must be logged in to Tag Records
Akubra : never out of place
Bib ID 7132647
Format PicturePicture [still image, text, sheet]
Description [Place of publication not identified] : Akubra Hats Pty Ltd, [between 1980 and 1990] 
1 poster : colour ; 56.3 x 41.6 cm 
Summary

Poster promoting the iconic Australian Akubra hat. Features a man in a suit and tie, Driza-bone and Akubra, tying a horse to a parking meter, all against a background of a cityscape. Title appears in black lettering at the head. The Akubra logo appears lower right.

Biography/History

"In 1874 Benjamin Dunkerley arrived in Tasmania from England and decided to start a hat making business in Hobart. His skills as a hatter were backed by his ability to invent machinery, and soon after his arrival he had developed a mechanical method of removing the hair tip from rabbit fur so the under-fur could be used in felt hat making. Previously this task had to be done by hand. In the early 1900's Dunkerley moved the business to Crown Street, Surry Hills, an inner suburb of Sydney, setting up a small hat making factory. In 1904 Stephen Keir I, who had also migrated from England, joined Dunkerley. Keir had hat making experience from England, and was seen as a valuable acquisition for the business. In 1905 he married Ada Dunkerley, Benjamin's daughter and soon after was made General Manager. Since that time the hat making firm has been in the hands of succeeding generations of the Keir family. In 1911, the business became Dunkerley Hat Mills Ltd, and had a mere nineteen employees. The trade name "Akubra" came into use in 1912. The increasing popularity resulted in the move to larger premises in Bourke Street, Waterloo and expanded production, especially of Slouch hats during World War I. Soon after all hats were branded Akubra."--Akubra website viewed 18 August, 2016, http://www.akubra.com.au/our-history.html

Notes

Caption title.

Subjects Akubra Hats Pty Ltd -- Posters.  |  Hats -- Australia -- Posters.  |  Felt hats -- Australia -- Posters.  |  Headgear -- Australia -- Posters.  |  Hat trade -- Australia -- Posters.  |  Parking meters -- Australia -- Posters.  |  Posters, Australian.  |  Australia -- Posters.  |  Australian
Other authors/contributors Akubra Hats Pty Ltd., issuing body
Terms of Use Copyright restrictions may apply. 

Online

    In the Library

    Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

    Order a copy

    - Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

    Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
    close Can I borrow items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close What can I get online?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
    Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.