National Library of Australia

<< Previous record  /  Next record >>
Record 16 of 44
You must be logged in to Tag Records
Sudanese children of the Dong and Okumu families playing on a trampoline, Newcastle, New South Wales, 2013 / Conor Ashleigh
Bib ID 7459973
Format PicturePicture, OnlineOnline [still image, online resource]
Author
Ashleigh, Conor, 1987- photographer
 
Online Access
Description 2013 
1 online resource (1 photograph) : TIFF file, colour 
Series

Australia's South Sudanese refugee community, 2010-2015.

Technical Details

image file : TIFF : 64MB 

Summary

"The Dong and Okumu families, both originally from South Sudan are from the Dinka and Acholi tribes respectively. Living in Newcastle, New South Wales, the families share a back fence and their children regularly play together. The families live in the suburb of Lambton which is also where the photographer grew up in, and where the Mayom family moved across the road in 2003."--Information supplied by photographer.

Notes

Title from acquisitions documentation.

Part of the collection: Australia's South Sudanese refugee community, 2010-2015.

Subjects Sudanese Australians -- New South Wales -- Newcastle -- Photographs.  |  Trampolines -- New South Wales -- Newcastle -- Photographs.  |  Wooden fences -- New South Wales -- Newcastle -- Photographs.  |  Refugee children -- Sudan -- Photographs.
Occupation Refugees.
Terms of Use Copyright restrictions may apply. 
000 01986ckd a2200373 i 4500
001 7459973
005 20191204144507.0
006 m     o  c        
007 cr cn |||a|n|n
008 170822s2013    xx nnn        s   inzxx  
035 |a7459973
040 |aANL|beng|erda|dANL
042 |aanuc
043 |au-at-ne|a|af-sj---
100 1 |aAshleigh, Conor,|d1987-|ephotographer.
245 1 0 |aSudanese children of the Dong and Okumu families playing on a trampoline, Newcastle, New South Wales, 2013 /|cConor Ashleigh.
264 1 |c2013.
300 |a1 online resource (1 photograph) :|bTIFF file, colour
336 |astill image|2rdacontent
337 |acomputer|2rdamedia
338 |aonline resource|2rdacarrier
347 |aimage file|bTIFF|c64MB
500 |aTitle from acquisitions documentation.
500 |aPart of the collection: Australia's South Sudanese refugee community, 2010-2015.
520 |a"The Dong and Okumu families, both originally from South Sudan are from the Dinka and Acholi tribes respectively. Living in Newcastle, New South Wales, the families share a back fence and their children regularly play together. The families live in the suburb of Lambton which is also where the photographer grew up in, and where the Mayom family moved across the road in 2003."--Information supplied by photographer.
540 |aCopyright restrictions may apply.
650 0 |aSudanese Australians|zNew South Wales|zNewcastle|vPhotographs.
650 0 |aTrampolines|zNew South Wales|zNewcastle|vPhotographs.
650 0 |aWooden fences|zNew South Wales|zNewcastle|vPhotographs.
650 0 |aRefugee children|zSudan|vPhotographs.
656 7 |aRefugees.|2lcsh
773 0 8 |iIn collection:|tAustralia's South Sudanese refugee community, 2010-2015|w(AuCNL)7222717
830 0 |aAustralia's South Sudanese refugee community, 2010-2015.
856 4 0 |zNational Library of Australia digital collection item.|uhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-506865272|xfulltext
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.