National Library of Australia

We’re delighted to be able to increase our reading room services and opening hours. Read more...

You must be logged in to Tag Records
Pig Iron Bob dead at last : obscene imperialist rites for militarist, witch-hunter : only the ruling class mourns its dead hero / by Chips Mackinolty
Bib ID 7830241
Format PicturePicture [still image, text, sheet]
Author
Mackinolty, Chips, artist
 
Description [Sydney, N.S.W.] : [Earthworks Poster Collective], [1978] 
1 poster : colour ; 76 x 52 cm 
Summary

Poster features black and white photographic screenprint of Sir Robert Menzies on a background of text relating to Menzies political career. The full main text wording printed in black, red and white reads 'Obscene imperialist rites for militarist, witch-hunter / Pig Iron Bob / dead at last / Only the ruling class / mourns its dead hero'. —https://ma.as/365418, viewed September 2018.

Biography/History

Robert Menzies became known as “Pig Iron Bob” in a 1938-1939 industrial dispute with waterside workers at Port Kembla. Supported by the local Chinese community, the wharfies refused to load scrap iron onto a ship called the Dalfram when they learned the pig iron was being sold to Japan, and, they believed, would be used to make weapons to be deployed against the Chinese, as demonstrated the Rape of Nanking in late 1937 (and ultimately against Australia). On 11 January 1939, then Attorney General Robert Menzies came to Wollongong to sort out the dispute. He confronted an angry crowd, where (according to Ted Roach, Secretary of the South Coast Branch of the Waterside Workers’ Federation) for the first time, Mrs Gwendoline Croft, a member of the union’s women’s relief committee, called out “Pig Iron Bob,” a nickname that dogged Menzies for the rest of his career. The name was subsequently picked up by others, notably Stan Moran, a well-known wharfie and communist orator, who thought he had used it first, if not most often, but in 1993 conceded it was a long time ago. —Edward C. Roach, “Menzies and Pig Iron for Japan,” Illawarra Unity - Journal of the Illawarra Branch of the Australian Society for the Study of Labour History, 1(1), 1996, 25-34; Tony Stephens, “‘Pig Iron‘ memories bob up,” Sydney Morning Herald, Saturday, 17 July 1993, page 9; The Dalfram Dispute 1938: Pig Iron Bob (2015; director, Sandra Pires).

Notes

Caption title.

Attribution and statement of responsibility from acquisitions documentation. Earthworks Poster Collective logo appears bottom left.

Subjects Menzies, Robert Sir, 1894-1978 -- Posters.  |  Posters, Australian.  |  Australia -- Posters.  |  Australian
Other authors/contributors Earthworks Poster Collective, issuing body
Also Titled

Obscene imperialist rites for militarist, witch-hunter : Pig Iron Bob dead at last : only the ruling class mourns its dead hero

Terms of Use Copyright restrictions may apply. 

Online

    In the Library

    Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

    Order a copy

    - Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

    Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
    close Can I borrow items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close What can I get online?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
    Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.