National Library of Australia

Enjoy a CovidSafe visit to the National Library. Read more...

You must be logged in to Tag Records
[Three printed circulars from the Admiralty Office, London, signed by second secretary to the Admiralty William Marsden, relating to the Hydrographic Survey and the Admiralty Chart, 1800]
Bib ID 8041217
Format BookBook, OnlineOnline [text, sheet]
Author
Marsden, William, 1754-1836
 
Online Versions
Printer [London, England] : Printed by G. Roberts, Admiralty Office, 1800
Description 3 letters : folded ; 32.2 cm 
Full contents
  • Circular from Admiralty [undated]
  • Circular, Admiralty Office, April 1800
  • Circular, Admiralty Office, 6th May, 1800. Addressed to Vice Admiral Lord H. Seymour, Commander in Chief of His Majesty's Ships at the Leeward Islands
 
Notes

Three circulars or letters dated 1800 from the Admiralty Office, London, instructing the masters of British naval vessels to record and transmit vital hydrographic information to the Admiralty. The circulars date from the time when the Admiralty Chart was first being planned. Each letter is signed by William Marsden as second secretary to the Admiralty.

Written on one side.

The undated circular makes mention of masters of vessels having previously failed to communicate information to the Admiralty, essential for the correction of naval charts. It goes on to instruct Captains and Lieutenants to forward information from journals, charts, plans, views of land, and other information such as prevailing winds, tides, reefs and other submerged obstacles.

The circular dated April 1800 repeats the demands of the undated circular in greater detail, adding the incentive that the names of those who furnish significant information shall be published on revised charts 'with a view to encouraging others to take advantage of the opportunities which may hereafter be afforded to them for obtaining the same useful information'.

The circular dated 6th May, 1800 is an example of a letter sent by William Marsden to senior naval officers, instructing them to distribute copies of the letters to their men. It also contains a manuscript note "To Vice Adml. Lord H. Seymour, Commander in Chief of His Majesty's Ships at the Leeward Islands". Lord Hugh Seymour was then serving as commander of the Royal Navy's Leeward Islands Station at English Harbour, Antigua. Transfered to command the Jamaica Station later in 1800, he died of yellow fever the following year.

Also available online http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-1125909672

Subjects Marsden, William, 1754-1836 -- Correspondence.  |  Seymour, Hugh Lord, 1759-1801 -- Correspondence.  |  Great Britain. Admiralty -- Records and correspondence.  |  Naval art and science -- Great Britain -- History.
Other authors/contributors Roberts, G., printer  |  Great Britain. Admiralty  |  Great Britain. Hydrographic Department

In the Library

Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

Order a copy

- Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.