National Library of Australia

We’re delighted to be able to increase our reading room services and opening hours. Read more...

You must be logged in to Tag Records
Peak Japan : the end of great ambitions / Brad Glosserman
Bib ID 8045366
Format BookBook [text, volume]
Author
Glosserman, Brad, author
 
Description Washington, DC : Georgetown University Press, [2019] 
viii, 263 pages ; 24 cm 
ISBN 9781626166691 (paperback ;) (alkaline paper)
1626166692 (paperback ;) (alkaline paper)
9781626166684 (hardcover ;) (alkaline paper)
1626166684 (hardcover ;) (alkaline paper)
Invalid ISBN 9781626166707 (electronic book)
Summary

The post-Cold War era has been difficult for Japan. A country once heralded for evolving a superior form of capitalism and seemingly ready to surpass the United States as the world's largest economy lost its way in the early 1990s. The bursting of the bubble in 1991 ushered in a period of political and economic uncertainty that has lasted for over two decades. There were hopes that the triple catastrophe of March 11, 2011--a massive earthquake, tsunami, and accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant--would break Japan out of its torpor and spur the country to embrace change that would restart the growth and optimism of the go-go years. But today Japan is still waiting for needed transformation, and Brad Glosserman concludes that the fact that even disaster has not spurred radical enough reform reveals something about Japan's political system. Glosserman explains why Japan will not change, concluding that Japanese horizons are shrinking and that the Japanese public has given up the bold ambitions of previous generations and its current leadership. This is an important insight into contemporary Japan and one that should shape our thinking about this vital country.

Full contents
  • Introduction
  • The unhappy country
  • The Lehman shock
  • The Seiji shokku
  • The Senkaku shokku
  • Higashi nihon daishinsai, or the "great East Japan earthquake"
  • Abe Shinzo's triumphant return
  • Peak Japan.
 
Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Subjects National security -- Japan.  |  Japan -- Politics and government -- 1989-  |  Japan -- Economic conditions -- 1989-  |  Japan -- Economic policy -- 1989-  |  Japan -- Foreign relations -- 1989-  |  Japan.
000 03074cam a2200469 i 4500
001 8045366
005 20190606094856.0
008 180628s2019    dcu      b    001 0 eng  
010 |a 2018025058
020 |a9781626166691|qpaperback ;|qalkaline paper
020 |a1626166692|qpaperback ;|qalkaline paper
020 |a9781626166684|qhardcover ;|qalkaline paper
020 |a1626166684|qhardcover ;|qalkaline paper
020 |z9781626166707|qelectronic book
024 8 |a40029093723
035 |a(OCoLC)1043954290
040 |aDGU/DLC|beng|erda|cDLC|dOCLCF|dOCLCO|dOCLCQ|dYDX|dOBE
043 |aa-ja---
050 0 0 |aDS891|b.G56 2019
082 0 0 |a952.05|223
100 1 |aGlosserman, Brad,|eauthor.
245 1 0 |aPeak Japan :|bthe end of great ambitions /|cBrad Glosserman.
264 1 |aWashington, DC :|bGeorgetown University Press,|c[2019]
300 |aviii, 263 pages ;|c24 cm
336 |atext|btxt|2rdacontent
337 |aunmediated|bn|2rdamedia
338 |avolume|bnc|2rdacarrier
504 |aIncludes bibliographical references and index.
505 0 |aIntroduction -- The unhappy country -- The Lehman shock -- The Seiji shokku -- The Senkaku shokku -- Higashi nihon daishinsai, or the "great East Japan earthquake" -- Abe Shinzo's triumphant return -- Peak Japan.
520 |aThe post-Cold War era has been difficult for Japan. A country once heralded for evolving a superior form of capitalism and seemingly ready to surpass the United States as the world's largest economy lost its way in the early 1990s. The bursting of the bubble in 1991 ushered in a period of political and economic uncertainty that has lasted for over two decades. There were hopes that the triple catastrophe of March 11, 2011--a massive earthquake, tsunami, and accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant--would break Japan out of its torpor and spur the country to embrace change that would restart the growth and optimism of the go-go years. But today Japan is still waiting for needed transformation, and Brad Glosserman concludes that the fact that even disaster has not spurred radical enough reform reveals something about Japan's political system. Glosserman explains why Japan will not change, concluding that Japanese horizons are shrinking and that the Japanese public has given up the bold ambitions of previous generations and its current leadership. This is an important insight into contemporary Japan and one that should shape our thinking about this vital country.
648 7 |aSince 1989|2fast
650 0 |aNational security|zJapan.
651 0 |aJapan|xPolitics and government|y1989-
651 0 |aJapan|xEconomic conditions|y1989-
651 0 |aJapan|xEconomic policy|y1989-
651 0 |aJapan|xForeign relations|y1989-
651 7 |aJapan.|2fast|0(OCoLC)fst01204082
776 0 8 |iOnline version:|aGlosserman, Brad.|tPeak Japan.|dWashington, DC : Georgetown University Press, 2019|z9781626166707|w(DLC) 2018032310
980 |b29.66|g1|zUSD
981 |bBO27|cRUNY
982 |a20190528
985 |a1768
close Can I borrow items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close What can I get online?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

You can view this on the NLA website.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.