National Library of Australia

The National Library building is closed temporarily until further notice, in line with ACT Government COVID-19 health restrictions.
Find out more

You must be logged in to Tag Records
Treaties in motion : the evolution of treaties from formation to termination / Malgosia Fitzmaurice, Queen Mary University of London; Panos Merkouris, University of Groningen
Bib ID 8528749
Format BookBook [text, volume]
Author
Fitzmaurice, Malgosia, 1957- author
 
Description Cambridge, United Kingdom ; New York, NY : Cambridge University Press, 2020 
xlii, 376 pages ; 24 cm. 
ISBN 9781108495882 ((hardback))
1108495885
9781108797924 ((paperback))
110879792X
Invalid ISBN 9781108863407 ((epub))
Series

Cambridge studies in international and comparative law (Cambridge, England : 1996) ; 149.

Summary

"The book deals with the dynamics of the treaty regime, it looks at treaty stability, identity and change, ie it looks at treaties in motion, how they were set out in the Vienna Convention and how they developed through practice and international decision making. Therefore, it can be said that kinesis and stasis (two sides of the same concept of 'motion') are the central themes of the present book. The concept of motion adopted in this book is based on the philosophy of Aristotle, who identified six types of motion, supplemented with the modern understanding of time as dimension where motion can occur, thus amending Aristotle's sixth type of motion from 'change in place' to 'change in space-time' and the non-existence of a preferred inertial frame of reference. Each Chapter's analysis proceeds by hopping between three different frames of reference, ie treaties, VCLT and customary law on treaties, and highlighting specifically one type of motion, while also identifying each type's interconnectedness with the others. Motion will be examined on two levels. First, on an examination of 'motion' itself and second on how 'motion' can be described with respect to the three aforementioned frames of references, and their respective interactions"--

Full contents
  • Motion as a notion
  • Treaty genesis: concept of a treaty in international law, including its formation and motion
  • Consent to be bound: the force behind the motion of treaties
  • Treaty interpretation and its rules: of motion through time, 'time-will' and 'time-bubbles'
  • Amendment/modification/revision of treaties: Motion as change
  • Treaties and their phthora : withdrawing from and terminating/suspending treaties
  • Concluding remarks.
 
Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Subjects Treaties.
Other authors/contributors Merkouris, Panos, author

Online

    In the Library

    Request this item to view in the Library's reading rooms using your library card. To learn more about how to request items watch this short online video Help Video.

    Details Collect From
    YY 2020-2038
    Copy: YY hbk
    Main Reading Room

    Order a copy

    - Copyright or permission restrictions may apply. We will contact you if necessary.

    Help Video To learn more about Copies Direct watch this short online video Help Video.
    close Can I borrow items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close What can I get online?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    close Can I get copies of items from the Library?

    You need Flash player 8+ and JavaScript enabled to view this video embedded.

    You can view this on the NLA website.

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
    Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.