National Library of Australia

Opening hours Australia Day long weekend: Saturday 25 & Sunday 26 January: Library open during regular opening hours; Monday 27 January: All Reading Rooms closed, Bookshop & Exhibition Galleries open from 9am-5pm.

Provided by Wikipedia

Joseph Gerrald (9 February 1763 – 16 March 1796) was a political reformer, one of the "Scottish Martyrs". He worked with the London Corresponding Society and the Society for Constitutional Information and also wrote an influential letter, A Convention the Only Means of Saving Us from Ruin. He was arrested for his radical views and convicted of sedition in 1794. Subsequently, he was deported to Sydney, where he died from tuberculosis in 1796.

Showing 1 - 20 of 30 Results for author-browse:"Gerrald, Joseph, 1763-1796"
Sort by:
 
 
Uniform title: Lives and trials of the Reformers of 1793-94. 1839
Glasgow : Muir, Gowans, 1839
 
 
Uniform title: Lives and trials of the Reformers of 1793-94. 1837
Glasgow : Muir, Gowans ; Edinburgh : William Tate, 1837
 
 
[London] : Printed for Citizen Lee, at the British Tree of Liberty, No. 98, Berwick Street, Soho ..., [1795]
 
 
by Gerrald, Joseph, 1763-1796
Edinburgh : Printed for James Robertson, and sold in London by D.I. Eaton, G. Kearsley, and J. Jordan, W. Ramsey, J. Marsom, and T. Gales, in Sheffield, [1794]
 
 
by Gerrald, Joseph, 1763-1796
Edinburgh : Printed for James Robertson, No. 4, Horse Wynd, and sold in London by D.I. Eaton, No. 74, Newgate street, G. Kearsley, No. 46, and J. Jordan, No. 166, Fleet street, W. Ramsey, No. 37, Bell Yard, Temple Bar, J. Marsom, No. 187, High Holborn, and by J. Montgomery, and Co. in Sheffield, [1794?]
BookBook, OnlineOnline
 
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.