National Library of Australia

Reopening Update - August 2020: Enjoy a CovidSafe visit to the National Library. Read more...

Provided by Wikipedia

Jane Carter Goodale (1926–2008) was an American anthropologist, author, photographer, and professor who worked to bring attention to the roles of women in Oceania and Australia through her extensive research in the field of ethnography. Having written and co-written numerous books and articles, the most notable being Tiwi Wives (1971), To Sing with Pigs Is Human (1995), The Two-Party Line (1996), Goodale's achievements and contributions to her field continue to have major importance in the sociological role of women as well as in continuing the field of ethnography today. Goodale received her BA and MA from Radcliffe College and later her PhD from the University of Pennsylvania. Goodale began her teaching career at Bryn Mawr College as a part-time instructor in 1959, becoming a full professor in the department of Anthropology in 1975, and served there until her retirement in 1996, when she became Professor Emerita. She also held teaching positions at Barnard College, the University of Pennsylvania, and the Darwin Institute of Technology. Goodale worked to bring attention and notability to the ethnographic research, dedicating her work and encouraging her students in the collection of facts and information on other cultures during a time when many felt the practice was outdated and ineffective.University of Illinois Press http://www.press.uillinois.edu/books/catalog/74kpd2km9780252032677.html</ref>

Showing 1 - 6 of 6 Results for author:"Goodale, Jane C. (Jane Carter), 1926-"
Sort by:
 
 
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Flags
Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other First Nations people are advised that this catalogue contains names, recordings and images of deceased people and other content that may be culturally sensitive. Please also be aware that you may see certain words or descriptions in this catalogue which reflect the author’s attitude or that of the period in which the item was created and may now be considered offensive.